Teachers are not at higher risk of dying from Covid than people working in other jobs, finds another study

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Teachers are no more likely to die from COVID than other employees, a major study has revealed today.

Researchers from the University of Bristol found that school workers – including teachers and school assistants – under the age of 64 had no higher risk of dying from the virus than people in other jobs.

According to the researchers, the death rate among female teachers in the first nine months of the pandemic was lower than the five-year average, while the death rate among male teachers was similar to the expected number.

However, there was a ‘death excess’ among those over 65 who worked in schools. But only a third of the additional death certificates listed Covid as the cause, suggesting other factors caused the death, the researchers found.

Experts said the study, published in the journal BMJ Open, should be considered by governments on whether to close schools in the future in the pandemic caused by the coronavirus.

“It will be important to note that employees were not at a higher risk of death than other occupations,” the team said.

After Covid hit the UK last March, schools were closed for months after students were forced to learn remotely and cancel their exams.

But children of key workers – such as frontline health and social care workers – and vulnerable pupils were allowed to go to school as usual.

Once schools reopened, rules forced students to isolate if they tested positive or came in contact with an infected person, leaving more than a million students absent from classes over the summer .

Some teachers lamented about being at risk from the virus and wanted schools to be closed before the government required them.

But a range of studies and real-world data have shown that there is no chance of teachers testing positive, suffering from a serious infection, or being hospitalized with Covid.

Teachers are no more likely to die from COVID than other employees, a major study has revealed today. Image: Teacher in the classroom during the Covid pandemic

The graph shows the death rate of COVID-19 per 100,000 men working in schools during the first nine months of the pandemic.  The virus death rate among female teachers was 10 per 100,000, compared with a range of nine to 50 per 100,000 for other occupations.

The graph shows the death rate of COVID-19 per 100,000 men working in schools during the first nine months of the pandemic. The virus death rate among female teachers was 10 per 100,000, compared with a range of nine to 50 per 100,000 for other occupations.

This graph shows the death rate of COVID-19 per 100,000 women working in schools during the first nine months of the pandemic.  The death toll due to the coronavirus among male secondary teachers was 39 per 100,000, compared with a range of 10 to 143 per 100,000 for other occupations.

This graph shows the death rate of COVID-19 per 100,000 women working in schools during the first nine months of the pandemic. The death toll due to the coronavirus among male secondary teachers was 39 per 100,000, compared with a range of 10 to 143 per 100,000 for other occupations.

Social distancing is pointless without a mask, suggests study

One study suggested that as long as you don’t wear a mask, the two-metre social distancing rule may still be followed by four in ten Britons today.

Researchers from the University of Cambridge found that a person without a mask can infect others at that distance even when out with Kovid.

Two meter social distancing rule imposed by UK government During the first lockdown in March 2020 But Britons were not encouraged to wear masks until May.

Experts and the government initially said that masks could do ‘more harm than good’ before the policy was reversed, making them mandatory on public transport in June and then in shops and public places next month.

The two-metre rule was shortened to one meter this July as part of an easing of pandemic restrictions.

The team said that their findings highlight the continuing importance of getting the COVID jab, ventilating indoor spaces and wearing masks during the winter months in the country.

The Bristol team analyzed death data for working adults aged 20 to 64 – published by the Office for National Statistics – between March 8 and December 28 last year.

They wanted to calculate the risk of dying from Covid among teachers – many of whom continued to work individually during the lockdown, compared to other occupations.

Researchers found that people working in schools had a lower death rate than those in ‘many other occupations’.

Mortality rates in the region ranged from 10 per 100,000 female primary school teachers to 39 per 100,000 male secondary school teachers.

For comparison, rates among other occupations — which the team did not name — ranged from nine to 50 per 100,000 women and between 10 and 143 per 100,000 men.

And the death rate among female teachers in the first nine months of the pandemic was below the five-year average, while the death rate among male teachers was similar to the five-year average.

The researchers found that there were more deaths among teaching assistants than the expected number, but noted that there was uncertainty surrounding this data.

However, among school staff over the age of 65, there was a ‘larger excess in deaths than the average for the previous five years’, the team found.

The researchers said that only a third of the additional deaths were recorded as the cause of death.

The study said the remaining additional deaths could be due to delays in treatment of other conditions caused by the pandemic.

The death rate may also be higher among older staff members because they stayed away from healthcare during the pandemic for fear of catching the virus or putting more burden on the NHS, the researchers said.

Professor Sarah Lewis, a molecular epidemiologist, university and lead author on the study, said: ‘Our research found that teachers and teaching and lunch assistants, aged between 20- and 64 years, were more likely to die from COVID-19. were not at high risk. Pandemic in 2020 compared to the working-age population in England and Wales.

‘There was weak evidence that the risk of death from Covid for secondary school teachers was slightly higher than expected, but overall, the death rate from Covid for school workers and all occupations was proportionate to their non-Covid death risk.’

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