HomeAsiaLt Col Stuart Scheller arrives solemnly for court hearing to plead Guilty

Lt Col Stuart Scheller arrives solemnly for court hearing to plead Guilty

Lieutenant Colonel Stuart Scheller has been charged with six violations and will face a special court martial for publicly criticizing the chaotic Afghanistan withdrawal.

Marine officer Lieutenant Colonel Stuart Scheller arrived solemnly for his special court martial this morning after his scathing social media attacks on top Army officers. Afghanistan return error.

40-year-old trailers has convicted six charges, including contempt towards officials and an officer and conduct of a gentleman, and his defense team, attorney Timothy Parltor including when she courtroom at Camp Lejyun Had gone, North Carolina.

Parltor exclusively told DailyMail.com: ‘It is interesting to note that senior leaders have not rejected his message. But they want to crush the messenger.’

Sklar waives his right to trial by jury and opts for trial by military judge alone.

Parlatore said outside the courtroom: ‘It is a matter of punishment. Stu has accepted the responsibility. He is going to confess his crime so it is not a matter of going in and saying hey he did the right thing but it is a matter of saying what is the proper punishment given the circumstances under which he did this video.

‘We hope he gets the letter of reprimand. We are not expecting any imprisonment. He has submitted his resignation and the Navy Secretary will take a decision on it later.

Colonel Stuart Schaller Jr. (seen in uniform) accompanied his defense team, including attorney Timothy Parlator, as they walked into the courtroom at Camp Lejeune, North Carolina, on Thursday.

Colonel Stuart Schaller Jr. (seen in uniform) accompanied his defense team, including attorney Timothy Parlator, as they walked into the courtroom at Camp Lejeune, North Carolina, on Thursday.

This morning Shelar arrived in a grim manner for his special court martial following his scathing social media attacks on top military officials over the withdrawal of Afghanistan.

This morning Shelar arrived in a grim manner for his special court martial following his scathing social media attacks on top military officials over the withdrawal of Afghanistan.

Asked how Scheller was feeling this morning, Parlator said: ‘No criminal defendant would feel so good walking into a courthouse. So obviously there are always nerves. But at the same time he is waiting for the opportunity to calm down and come out, accept responsibility.

Army charges against Lieutenant Colonel Stuart Sklar

  • COdislike of officers
  • Disrespect towards high commissioned officers
  • Willful disobedience to a senior commissioned officer
  • Negligence in discharge of duties
  • failure to comply with an order or regulation
  • conduct indecent an officer and a gentleman

The matter started with a demand for accountability. Today he is going to show the Pentagon what it looks like to stand up and take accountability for his actions.’

Sklar has been presented before the court after publicly demanding the Pentagon’s leadership accept greater accountability for their roles in the fiasco – which saw the Taliban’s advance of power over the capital, Kabul, and the resulting massacre.

Decorated 17-year veteran – just three years from retirement – began attacking its first social media generals on August 26, the day to kill American service personnel and 170 Afghan civilians, 13 by ISIS suicide bombers Hamid Kji Airport had gone.

The next day he was largely removed from his job of commanding an infantry school at Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune. Marine spokesman Major Jim Stanger said at the time that this was due to a “lack of confidence and confidence in their ability to command”.

Despite the firing, Shelar continued to post another video and written statement on social media in protest of the restraining order. It also went viral, garnering hundreds of thousands of views.

In one he promised to file charges against the commander of US Central Command, General Frank McKenzie, saying: ‘Senior leaders should be held as accountable as we are.’

He was finally sent to the Brigadier – the Marine’s prison – on 27 September, giving him a massive base of support to get him out of serious imprisonment. He was freed a week later on 5 October after his lawyers came to an agreement with the Marine Corps.

His legal team told DailyMail.com that Scheller would plead six misdemeanor charges. The contempt towards officials, senior commissioning disrespect to officials, willful disobedience of senior Commission officials, negligence in performance of duties, order or failure to comply with the regulation, and an officer and conduct of a gentleman indecent.

In a nearly five-minute video posted on Facebook and LinkedIn, he said: ‘The reason people are upset on social media right now is not because Marines have let anyone down on the battlefield. That service member always rose to the occasion and did an extraordinary job.

“People are upset because their senior leaders have let them down. And none of them are raising their hands and accepting accountability or saying, ‘we messed it up’.

To ‘I blank’m not saying that we will remain forever in Afghanistan, but I am saying, do any of you throw on the rank table and said’ Hey, Bagram Airfield, a strategic airport that It’s a bad idea before we all evacuate’. Has anyone done this? And just when you didn’t think to do that, did someone raise a hand and say, ‘We totally messed it up?’

Marine Lt. Col. Stuart Scheller was thrown into the brigade for breaking the gag order when the soldier detonated the US hasty withdrawal from Afghanistan.

Marine Lt. Col. Stuart Scheller was thrown into the brigade for breaking the gag order when the soldier detonated the US hasty withdrawal from Afghanistan.

A source close to the case says that Shelar usually lived in the Brigadier's area for the killers.

A source close to the case says that Shelar usually lived in the Brigadier’s area for the killers.

Schaller publicly shared his resignation letter, addressed it to Secretary of the Navy Carlos del Toro and cited a

Schaller publicly shared his resignation letter, addressed it to Secretary of the Navy Carlos del Toro and cited a “lack of confidence and confidence in your ability to lead”.

The officer – who completed tours of Afghanistan and Iraq and was awarded a Bronze Star – continued: ‘I have battalion commander friends posting things, thinking all the lives lost in the last 20 years were wasted. .

‘From my position, potentially all those people would have died if we didn’t have senior leaders who raise their hands and say, ‘We didn’t do this well in the end’.

‘Without this we just keep repeating the same mistakes, economic, slash, corporate, slash, political, slash, this amalgamation of high military ranks is not ending the bargain.

‘I want to say this very strongly. I have been fighting for 17 years. I have to throw everything to say to my senior leaders, I demand accountability.

In another video he said: ‘Today, 17 years later, I am not currently pending for legal action, and I may be in the Marine Corps for three more years, but I don’t think I’m walking that path. I am resigning from my commission as a United States Marine, effective now… I am losing my retirement eligibility. I don’t want a single dollar. I don’t want any money from VA…

‘I only sought accountability of my senior leaders when clear, obvious mistakes were made. I am not saying that we can take back what has been done. I only asked for accountability. Comment on what I said for people, and say ‘yes, mistakes were made’.

At least 36 Congress members signed a letter calling for his release while in the brigade. The move was led by Rep. Louis Gohart (R-Texas), who said the officer’s imprisonment “seems to be for message, vengeance and convenience”.

Gohmrt the Marine Corps commander Gen. David Berger wrote: “Given the more than 15 years of his outstanding record and dedicated service, we have seen do not believe there is no evidence that LTC trailers serious risk of criminal misconduct.”

A special court limits the maximum punishment for service members if found guilty of matrimonial. It cannot punish an officer with imprisonment or punitive discharge. His legal team has told Dailymail.com that they are looking forward to discharge with an honorable discharge or a letter of reprimand under honorable terms.

In a video, the officer’s offer to leave the Marines and forfeit his $2 million pension was rejected by the military.

The Pipe Hitter Foundation — a legal aid group for service personnel and first responders — says it has raised $2 million to protect Sklar.

It is run by former Navy SEAL Eddie Gallagher, who himself made headlines when he was court martialed in 2019 on war crimes charges over the death of an ISIS fighter.

Despite being acquitted of most charges, the Navy sought to remove Gallagher from the elite unit and demote him. But he was allowed to retire as SEAL’s chief petty officer after the intervention of then-President Donald Trump.

Supporters raise more than $2 million for Marines defying orders to stop publicly criticizing country's return to Afghanistan

Supporters raise more than $2 million for Marines defying orders to stop publicly criticizing country’s return to Afghanistan

US Marine Lieutenant Colonel Stuart Shelar, pictured with mother Katherine and father Stuart Sr.

US Marine Lieutenant Colonel Stuart Shelar, pictured with mother Katherine and father Stuart Sr.

The progress of the Taliban’s power over Kabul to secure control of Afghanistan came after President Joe Biden announced in July that the US withdrawal from the country was scheduled for August 31.

His fighters dramatically captured the capital on 15 August and immediately imposed their extreme radical rule on the city after 20 years of independence for its citizens.

This led to scenes of desperation and violence at Kabul airport as thousands – including US citizens – gathered for relief flights out of the country. Biden later admitted that “100 to 200” Americans who wanted to leave were left behind when the last soldiers withdrew.

As part of the defense, it is believed that Sklar’s team plans to implement the recent testimony of the chairman of the Joint Chiefs, General Mark Milley, who admitted that he had spoken with the authors of the books in which he The Commander-in-Chief, former President Trump, was cited for humiliation.

The defense plans to argue that while Milley is not being held accountable for criticizing his commander, Schaller is being tried for the same crime.

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