KP Hospitals resumes OPD service as Covid cases continue to decline

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Peshawar: Following the decline in the number of COVID-19 cases in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, public sector hospitals have started fully serving people in outpatient departments.

On Tuesday, three more people died of the virus in the state and 76 new cases were reported. According to a health department report, two died in Peshawar and one in Dera Ismail Khan.

The Khyber Pakhtunkhwa government in April 2020 ordered the closure of optional services in hospitals to focus on the management of people infected with COVID-19 and control its transmission.

Hospitals set up triage to filter Covid-19 suspected patients and protect healthcare workers from getting infected.

KP. Three more deaths and 76 cases were reported from the virus in

The closure of services in hospitals adversely affected about 200,000 patients, who visit OPDs in about 2,474 health facilities in the province every day for treatment.

The health department in April asked hospitals to reopen OPDs for vaccinated people on a limited basis and most hospitals resumed normal OPD service with adherence to COVID-19 standard operating procedures and vaccinations.

Health department officials said the coronavirus cases and death toll continued to decline as the province has been reporting an average of 100 Covid-19 patients and three deaths per day for the past month.

Read also: Kovid vaccination increases in KP after being linked to documentation

He said that most of the hospitals have resumed OPD service.

Lady Reading Hospital (LRH), which continued to receive 3,000 patients in the accident and emergency department during the COVID-19 restrictions, had resumed OPD service with 2,500 patients per day.

“We allow 2,000 patients to get OPD slips on a daily basis and hospitalize emergency patients. A 400-bed COVID-19 complex has been set up to receive patients from across the province. Now the situation of COVID-19 has eased so we have resumed OPD service,” said LRH spokesperson Mohammad Asim dawn,

They were vaccinating people before they went to the doctors in the OPD, he said.

He said jabs were given to more than 200,000 people in the hospital.

Director of Bachha Khan Medical Complex in Swabi, Dr Khalid Masood said that they have started full services from last one month but patients and their relatives need to get vaccinated and follow COVID-19 precautions.

“All specialized services are available in OPDs and patients are admitted for elective services like hernia and gallstone surgeries, which were not allowed by the government in the recent past due to COVID-19,” he said. said.

Khyber Teaching Hospital (KTH) and Hayatabad Medical Complex (HMC), which along with LRH largely handled coronavirus patients in the province and remained closed for non-Covid-19 patients, also resumed full health services. did.

KTH Associate Director Dr Saudul Islam said that full scale services have been started in the hospital.

Professor Shahzad Akbar Khan, Medical Director of HMC, said that he provided full services to the people and also managed dengue and corona patients.

“We have played a frontline role in COVID-19 and 18 patients are still being treated as in-patients. We have taken infection control measures and made SOPs mandatory for coming to the hospital,” he said.

Health officials said the resumption of elective services in government health facilities is benefitting patients who were completely dependent on free services.

He said shutting down services in hospitals helped him put the brakes on the transmission of the virus to healthcare workers.

He said more than 30 health workers died of Covid-19, while the number of infected medics stood at 4,419.

He said that during COVID-19, only alternative services remained closed, which could have been delayed and did not cause any harm to the patient, but emergency patients were treated as usual in hospitals.

Officials said the closure of those services in hospitals helped them strengthen the emergency service and focus on managing coronavirus patients.

Published in Dawn, November 24, 2021