Hawaii warns tourists they will now need a COVID booster shot to be fully vaccinated

Tourists in Hawaii will be required to get their COVID-19 booster shot, which will be considered fully vaccinated, to avoid the mandatory five-day quarantine upon arrival.

Gov. David Ige did a . Announced plans for new Safe Travels Policy during Press conference Last week.

“We want to see a booster shot for people who have been fully vaccinated within five or six months of completing their vaccination regimen,” he said. ‘We are looking to see what actions are needed to implement this in safe travel.’

Under the current rules, passengers who do not want to quarantine should get two doses of pfizer or Modern a dose of vaccine or johnson and johnson Vaccination. Even a negative COVID test taken within a day of travel is enough to survive the quarantine.

Ige announces as Hawaii reports spike in positive COVID cases, as well as increased hospitalizations and death rates – possibly due to rising omicron The variant that is affecting citizens across the country.

Over the past two weeks, the number of COVID deaths in the US has increased by 36 percent, even as an increase in the Omron version indicates that daily infections are falling. At least 1,839 Americans are dying from the virus every day – but that’s far less than the peak number of deaths during the delta surge.

A record 155,000 people are being hospitalized with the virus daily – a 61 percent increase over the past two weeks and an all-time pandemic record. However, experts note that this figure may be misleading and there are calls for better data collection practices to be implemented.

Hawaii Gov. David Ige will soon require tourists to get their COVID-19 booster shot to be fully vaccinated and to skip the state’s five-day quarantine policy

In the wake of rising cases, Ige is trying to take additional steps to keep Hawaii residents safe, including creating a definition of ‘fully vaccinated’ to include booster shots.

He said the change to the safe itinerary would not happen for at least two weeks, giving travelers a chance to boost their plans or adjust accordingly.

‘We know the community needs time to react to that, so we need to give at least two weeks for those who may not be up-to-date to go and get vaccinated if necessary. get the opportunity,’ Ige explained.

The governor is also discussing with county leaders and mayors the need for booster shots for access to restaurants and events, but said the decision ultimately lies with local leaders.

However, he noted that he would be willing to step in and issue a statewide order if Hawaii’s hospitals and medical system were toppled by a boom.

Ige announced plans for a new safe travel policy during a press conference last week as the Omron version continues to rise and Hawaii's airports face longer wait times as officials conduct essential coronavirus screenings .

Ige announced plans for a new safe travel policy during a press conference last week as the Omron version continues to rise and Hawaii’s airports face longer wait times as officials conduct essential coronavirus screenings .

Under current rules, travelers who do not wish to quarantine must receive two doses of Pfizer or Moderna Vaccine or one dose of Johnson & Johnson Vaccine.  Even a negative COVID test taken within a day of travel is enough to survive the quarantine

Under current rules, travelers who do not wish to quarantine must receive two doses of Pfizer or Moderna Vaccine or one dose of Johnson & Johnson Vaccine. Even a negative COVID test taken within a day of travel is enough to survive the quarantine

Meanwhile, in recent weeks, travelers have complained of long lines and wait times at Hawaii’s airports as the state grapples with a COVID-related staffing shortage.

During the first week of the year, arriving travelers reported waiting hours for authorities to show proof of vaccination or a negative COVID test.

Aviation experts allege that the extended wait times stem from airlines reducing or suspending their pre-screening operations at mainland gates.

Sherri Kajiwara, special projects administrator for the state’s Safe Travel Program, said, “Sometimes they have an agent screening and they can get through 25 to 50 people and the rest have to be screened here on Oahu. ” Hawaii News Now on 4 january

Kajiwara pointed out that airlines do not receive financial compensation for screening passengers for safe travel eligibility, so are often forced to prioritize flight operations when faced with staffing shortages.

The Hawaii Department of Health reported 4,700 new coronavirus infections on Monday, bringing the state-wide total to 174,586.  The state has seen an average of 4,087 cases in seven days

The Hawaii Department of Health reported 4,700 new coronavirus infections on Monday, bringing the state-wide total to 174,586. The state has seen an average of 4,087 cases in seven days

The COVID death toll in the state has gone up to 1,126, with no additional deaths reported on Monday.  Seven days average for deaths 4.  Is

The COVID death toll in the state has gone up to 1,126, with no additional deaths reported on Monday. Seven days average for deaths 4. Is

The average seven-day hospitalization in Hawaii is also 367.  Is

The average seven-day hospitalization in Hawaii is also 367. Is

However, passengers have reportedly found the entire process frustrating and inconvenient.

‘The whole thing is frustrating – especially if you’re not coming out of the country. Just being a regular American you should be able to come and go however you want,’ Lonnie Sorsey of Foresthill, California, told the news outlet.

The Hawaii Department of Health reported 4,700 new coronavirus infections on Monday, bringing the state-wide total to 174,586. On an average, 4,087 cases have been reported in the state in seven days.

The COVID death toll in the state has gone up to 1,126, with no additional deaths reported on Monday. The seven-day average for deaths is 4.

The average seven-day hospitalization in Hawaii is 367.

Ige said the change to the safe itinerary won't happen for at least two weeks, giving travelers a chance to boost their plans or adjust accordingly.

Ige said the change to the safe itinerary won’t happen for at least two weeks, giving travelers a chance to boost their plans or adjust accordingly.

The US daily case average eclipsed 800,000 for the first time over the weekend, with the height of the Omicron surge now reaching four times as many cases as the peak of the delta wave. Case disparities haven’t translated into more deaths, however, as the US is recording 1,839 deaths every day – the most since early October – still well below the average of 3,200 deaths per day, as of late Delta is at the peak of the boom. September.

The cases also seem to be at their peak. Case growth is slowing week-on-week across the country. New daily cases have increased by only seven per cent over the previous week, compared to a 75 per cent increase a week ago. New York and New Jersey were hit hard and fast by the variant last month, but cases in neighboring states are now declining over the past two weeks – down 14 percent and 20 percent, respectively.

US Surgeon General Dr Vivek Murthy has warned that the peak may not be as close as some believe. They told CNN Not every state will experience Sunday that is currently moving along the East Coast.

“There are parts of the country – New York, specifically, and other parts of the Northeast – where we are starting to see a plateau, and in some cases, an initial decline in cases,” Murthy said.

‘The challenge is that the whole country is not growing at the same pace’

‘The Omicron wave started later in other parts of the country, so we should not expect a national peak in the next coming days. The next few weeks will be tough.

The US daily case average eclipsed 800,000 for the first time over the weekend, with the height of the Omicron surge reaching four times as many cases as the peak of the delta wave.

The US daily case average eclipsed 800,000 for the first time over the weekend, with the height of the Omicron surge reaching four times as many cases as the peak of the delta wave.

Over the past two weeks, the number of COVID deaths in the US has increased by 36 percent, even as an increase in the Omron version indicates that daily infections are falling

Over the past two weeks, the number of COVID deaths in the US has increased by 36 percent, even as an increase in the Omron version indicates that daily infections are falling

A record 155,000 people are being hospitalized with the virus daily - a 61 percent increase over the past two weeks and an all-time pandemic record

A record 155,000 people are being hospitalized with the virus daily – a 61 percent increase over the past two weeks and an all-time pandemic record

There is currently a large gap between the case change rates between states east of the Mississippi River and those west of it, as the virus appears to have traveled west after an initial surge along the east coast.

What happens in the UK often advances the US by a few weeks. Across the pond, cases continue to decline after a massive surge in the country last month. The country reported 84,429 new cases on Monday, and the daily case average fell to the nearly 100,000 mark – and is likely to fall further in the coming days.

New cases continue to decline in South Africa as well. The country that first detected the variant – and suffered a major outbreak before it – is now reporting less than 5,000 new COVID cases per day only a few weeks ago, rising to a high of more than 23,000 per day. has reached.

,