HomeAmericaFurious bikie explodes new 'compulsory makeup rule' and compares WA to Nazi...

Furious bikie explodes new ‘compulsory makeup rule’ and compares WA to Nazi Germany

An illegal biker gang member has condemned a new Western Australian law that could force him and his fellow tattooed accomplices to wear makeup.

Chris ‘Ballistic’ Orchard, whose motto implied danger that ‘I shake hands to negotiate … I throw a hand in comparison to a tougher new law’ Ban on public display of gang insignia for ‘Nazi Germany’.

Orchard, a member of the Coffin Cheaters Gang, wrote, ‘Just like we are now in (are) North Korea (or) Nazi Germany, whatever you want to call it, we are there, whoever thinks it is right, You are in confusion. Facebook.

Chris ‘Ballistic’ Orchard (pictured left) is all smiles in this photo, but not so happy with a new Western Australian law that could force him to cover up his bikey tattoo with makeup.

The new bill, dubbed Australia’s ‘toughest’, targets 46 clubs including Coffin Cheaters, Hell’s Angels, Rebels, Bandidos and Gypsy Clowns and bans all words associated with them in public.

Acting WA Police Commissioner Colonel Blanche said people like Hell’s Angel Dene Brajkovic with heavily tattooed tattoos may need to start wearing makeup or ‘Band-Aids’.

Among Brajkovic’s many tattoos is the words ‘Hell’s Angels’ on his forehead and ‘1%er’ on his neck.

Dayan Brajkovic is leaving the court.  A new law in Western Australia could force them to wear makeup to cover their tattoos

Dayan Brajkovic is leaving the court. A new law in Western Australia could force them to wear makeup to cover their tattoos

The tattoo ‘1%er’ is accepted as claiming ownership of an illegal motorcycle gang and is widely used to imply that the wearer has committed violent acts for his club.

The law would make it illegal to ‘display a forbidden insignia’, which includes wearing gang patches and even going out in public with gangs that refer to tattoos.

It will go before the Western Australian Parliament this week and is likely to be passed.

Face tattoos, clothing, or even stickers or painted insignia on a motorcycle or car will be included in the bill.

‘I’ll start with things like Band-Aids or makeup or take it off or alternatively, people can choose not to live in Western Australia if this law is passed,’ Mr. Blanche told 6PR’s morning program, referring to Brajkovic.

Hell's Angels Sergeant-at-Arms Dene Brajkovic is famous for his distinctive tattoos that cover most of his body.  He has been produced in the previous court

Hell’s Angels Sergeant-at-Arms Dene Brajkovic is famous for his distinctive tattoos that cover most of his body. He has been produced in the previous court

Coffin Cheaters was formed in 1970 in Perth, Western Australia. It is said to be the first Australian gang to expand internationally, with affiliated chapters in Norway following ‘patch over’ mergers in 2004 and 2005.

The Coffin Cheater Orchard has also called for a brutal response to another group of lawbreakers.

‘Instead of us removing or covering up our tattoos, you force child molesters to get tattoos to identify them and to show them in public all the time?’ he said.

A commenter named Mick Cannon concurred with Orchard and singled out the politicians. ‘It means all you politicians who like to play with children too. You all should get it tattooed on the forehead of the f**king king again,’ he said.

Another supporter, Jason Nankiwell, wrote that he ‘couldn’t agree more. Yet churches can harbor pedophiles and Islam terrorists without any problem.

Chris 'Ballistic' Orchard (pictured right) is deeply concerned that a new law in Western Australia will force him to cover up his prized tattoo

Chris ‘Ballistic’ Orchard (pictured right) is deeply concerned that a new law in Western Australia will force him to cover up his prized tattoo

Orchard compared Western Australia’s proposed crackdown on illegal bike gangs to people living in “Nazi Germany”, which also found support on their Facebook page.

Sam Howat is concerned that the law could cause people to overheat on hot summer days. ‘So on a 43 degree day you have to wear a jumper because you have a name tattoo on your arm. That’s fu**ed!,’ he wrote.

Another called for physical autonomy within the biker gang community to be respected by the State Government of Western Australia.

Jason Ritchie wrote, ‘Crap shit that people have there (sic) bodies, there (sic) likes where (sic) North Korea ain’t FFS.

In April, WA Police Commissioner Chris Dawson sentenced Hells Angels Sergeant-at-Arms Brajkovic’s dress to hearing at Perth Magistrates Court as ‘unacceptable’.

He wore a jersey bearing the name HAMC of the Hell’s Angels Motorcycle Club and ‘HOF CITY’ on it, which is believed to be a nod to a chapter of the gang in the German city of Hof.

His jersey also had the number 81 on the jersey, a very subtle nod to the Hell’s Angels, with H being the eighth letter in the alphabet and A being the first.

The new bill, touted as Australia's 'toughest', targets 46 clubs including Hell's Angels, Rebels, Bandidos, Gypsy Clowns and Coffin Cheaters, by banning all words associated with them in public.

The new bill, touted as Australia’s ‘toughest’, targets 46 clubs including Hell’s Angels, Rebels, Bandidos, Gypsy Clowns and Coffin Cheaters, by banning all words associated with them in public.

Brajkovic beats Rebels biker kingpin Nick Martin during a brawl at a bar on November 24, 2020, two weeks before Martin was shot at the Perth Motorplex in Quinna Beach.

Mr Dawson said Brajkovic’s tattoos and clothing were “absolutely disrespectful not only to the court but to the community”.

‘We are not overly sensitive about what people wear, it is absolute defiance to say ‘I am out of the law and I am going to be outside the law’.

The maximum penalty for wearing a prohibited insignia under the new law is 12 months in prison, a fine of up to $12,000 for individuals or up to $60,000 for ‘corporations’.

Mr. Blanche said the law is anti-sale gang, not anti-tattoo.

‘Young people are drawn to biker clubs as an outlaw motorcycle gang has a display of insignia, numbers as power on display.’

Brajkovic's quirky fashion statement came off the court for Western Australian Police Commissioner Chris Dawson (pictured).

Brajkovic’s quirky fashion statement came off the court for Western Australian Police Commissioner Chris Dawson (pictured).

Under the new law, gang members could face a $12,000 fine and 12 months in prison for “struggling” after being issued a notice to disperse.

Gang members can be ordered to stay away from each other for up to three years and after two or more violations, gang members can be jailed for up to five years.

WA Police Minister Paul Papalia said the new law was part of a plan to “systematically eliminate bike gangs in this state.”

‘We are determined to make WA a safer place, without fear of bikers pursuing their own vengeance at the expense of law-abiding citizens.’

Brajkovic was charged with an altercation in November - two weeks before Martin's death - in which the pair fought at a busy bar in the Perth beach suburb of Scarborough.

Brajkovic was charged with an altercation in November – two weeks before Martin’s death – in which the pair fought at a busy bar in the Perth beach suburb of Scarborough.

WA Attorney General John Quigley says law intentionally names ’46’ Organizations, which include illegal motorcycle gangs, their affiliated gangs or ‘feeder clubs’ and street gangs from across Australia.

‘These organizations and their patches are designed to show affiliation with criminality and to intimidate others, including law-abiding citizens in our community. It will stop after the implementation of these laws.

‘These laws represent the toughest and most comprehensive reforms to fight organized crime of all Australian states and territories.’

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