Countdown host Anne-Marie Imafidon and her notable relatives

Countdown to the prodigy’s family! GCSEs ten, Oxford on 15… Anne-Marie Imafidon has made the move to TV Rachel Riley but she isn’t the only star among her notable relatives

  • Anne-Marie Imafidon, 31, is the first black co-presenter on Channel 4 show standing in for Rachel Riley on maternity leave
  • Anne-Marie speaks six languages ​​and began her Oxford degree at age 15, becoming one of the youngest people to be awarded a master’s degree by the university at only 20 years old.
  • His sister Christiana, now 28, attended Durham Uni at the age of 11; and sister Samantha, 24, works for Microsoft; She passed the maths and statistics GCSE exam at the age of six
  • Twins Peter and 21-year-old Paula passed GCSE maths at the age of six. A year later, they changed it to an A-level . became the youngest to pass in


She started her degree at Oxford at the age of 15 and by 20 she was awarded a Masters. So it should come as no surprise that Anne-Marie Imafidon has become Countdown’s math expert.

And, as she and her four siblings passed GCSE maths before the age of ten, her family has a strong claim to be among the most intelligent in Britain.

Anne-Marie, 31, becomes first black co-presenter channel 4 show, stand for Rachel Riley on maternity leave.

She hopes to inspire kids to aim as high as she and her siblings did. “Countdown is an institution and I love math,” she said.

‘If I am able to inspire just another mathematician or mathematician by becoming my authentic self on screen then I am happy to be able to take that space and show a different side of arithmetic.’

Anne-Marie Imafidon, 31, has become the first black co-presenter on a Channel 4 show standing in for Rachel Riley on maternity leave. Since she and her four siblings passed GCSE maths before the age of ten, her family claims to be among the most intelligent in Britain.

Anne-Marie (pictured) is hoping to inspire children to aim as high as she and her siblings did.  'Countdown is an institution and I love math,' she said

Anne-Marie (pictured) is hoping to inspire children to aim as high as she and her siblings did. ‘Countdown is an institution and I love math,’ she said

His father, Nigeria-born Professor Chris Imafidon, believes his formula for success is simple, but the UK education system continues to get it wrong.

He added: ‘We just need to know what a child does and allow them to explore that inclination.

For example, when we noticed that one of our children showed interest in music, we allowed him to engage with it regardless of age.’

Anne-Marie speaks six languages ​​and began her Oxford degree at age 15, becoming one of the youngest people to be awarded a master’s degree by the university at only 20 years old.

Her father said: ‘Anne-Marie was seven years old when we started giving her hard work – but she was never told the questions were not for her age group. He needed to go beyond the pace and scope of the curriculum.

The failure of the education system to inspire others has meant Professor Imafidon had mixed feelings when he joined the countdown last month.

On the countdown, people get frozen when they talk about numbers. They think math is a difficult concept and it just becomes a self-fulfilling prophecy,’ he said.

The rest of the family members are equally remarkable. Anne-Marie’s sister Christiana, now 28 years old, became a record breaker when she attended Durham University at the age of 11.

She is working in financial technology, with degrees from Oxford and the University of Pennsylvania.

Samantha, 24, who worked for Microsoft, passed the maths and statistics GCSE exam at the age of six.

Three years later in 2007, she became the youngest child in the UK to start secondary school.

Twins Peter and 21-year-old Paula passed GCSE maths at the age of six. A year later, he became the youngest to make it to the A-level.

Anne-Marie with Countdown host Anne Robinson (center) and Dictionary Corner's Susie Dent.  Anne-Marie said, 'If I am able to inspire just another mathematician or mathematician by becoming my authentic self on screen, then I am happy to be able to take that space and show a different side of arithmetic, ' said Anne-Marie.

Anne-Marie with Countdown host Anne Robinson (center) and Dictionary Corner’s Susie Dent. Anne-Marie said, ‘If I am able to inspire just another mathematician or mathematician by becoming my authentic self on screen, then I am happy to be able to take that space and show a different side of arithmetic, ‘ said Anne-Marie.

He broke another record in 2009 by passing the Advanced Mathematics Examination of the University of Cambridge at the age of eight.

And the only ‘rebellion’ Professor Imafidon faced was the different learning styles of his children.

He said: ‘No two read the same subject – they were allowed to choose what they were doing.

‘Because they were rewarded, they never saw what they were doing as a study – it was as if they were pursuing their passion, whether it was in math, musical instruments or sports.’

,