British journalist told by Republican politician Siobhan Kennedy to ‘go back to his country’

a furious Republican said one channel 4 Journalist for ‘going back to his country’ after questioning US gun laws.

Georgia Representative Marjorie Taylor Green became outraged after Siobhan Kennedy questioned the legitimacy of the Second Amendment at a press conference in the US.

The outspoken Green, 48, stepped away from the microphone when Siobhan told the UK there were no “mass shootings” or the Second Amendment.

She became verbally aggressive and barked that it was “our job to defend the Second Amendment,” which gives American citizens the right to own guns.

Siobhan said: ‘We don’t have guns in Britain, that’s true, but we don’t have mass shootings either. And our children are not afraid to go to school.

Controversial politician shot out loud: ‘You have to get a massive stabbing, lady. You have all kinds of killings and you have laws against it.

Channel 4’s Washington correspondent retorted: ‘Don’t like the rates here.’

Green removed the statement by responding: ‘Okay, you can go back to your country and worry about not having your guns.’

Channel 4’s Washington correspondent Siobhan Kennedy questions firebrand Republicans about their views on gun laws. She was attending a press conference in the US regarding the Second Amendment caucus

Marjorie Taylor Green, 48, became verbally aggressive towards the journalist at a press conference yesterday after the female reporter pointed out that there is no 'mass shooting' in the UK nor the Second Amendment.

Marjorie Taylor Green, 48, became verbally aggressive towards the journalist at a press conference yesterday after the female reporter pointed out that there is no ‘mass shooting’ in the UK nor the Second Amendment.

Brazen Green shared the clip on his Twitter page, writing: ‘When the British press wants to debate our God-given American gun rights, my answer is:’ “Go back to your country.”

Who is Siobhan Kennedy?

Siobhan joined Channel 4 News in 2008 after working as a politics and business correspondent for the Times in Westminster.

She is now their Washington correspondent based in DC, and was awarded the Capital Association’s award for Best National Newspaper Journalist in 2007.

Prior to joining the Times team in Westminster, Siobhan worked as mergers and private equity correspondent for its business section.

Prior to The Times, Siobhan led a team covering mergers, banking and Citi for Reuters.

She spent five years in New York covering the collapse of some of America’s biggest companies, including World Command Global Crossing.

Siobhan was one of the first reporters on the scene for Reuters during the 9/11 terrorist attacks and received praise for his series of post-crisis stories.

Hitting back online, Siobhan said: ‘Marjorie Taylor Greene isn’t happy with me that the proposed gun law isn’t about taking away her guns!

Nor is the knife crime in the UK in any way equivalent to a gun crime here. There is no “mass stabbing” in the UK. ‘Still here children are afraid to go to school?’

Speaking to MailOnline, Siobhan said that by reposting the footage online, the Republican was ‘doubling down’ on his opinion.

She said: ‘It was a press conference of the Second Amendment caucus – in other words, a group of very conservative Republicans who disapprove of gun control of any kind, such as legislation running through Congress right now, the passage of which Very likely to happen.

‘When I asked him and the other members of the group what they were afraid of, it was a big back-and-forth—that no one was threatening to take away their guns.

‘It is important to call out these politicians and give them an account’

The convention comes a day after the Senate agreed on Tuesday a bipartisan gun control bill that aims to toughen background checks for young gun buyers.

It would also increase penalties for gun traffickers, and deter romantic partners convicted of domestic abuse, who have not married their victims, from obtaining firearms.

14 Republicans in the Senate joined 48 Democrats on the bill, along with two independents.

Despite this, Green said boldly to the British journalist: ‘We like ours’ [guns] Here.’

An outspoken Republican asked the anonymous journalist to

An outspoken Republican asked the anonymous journalist to “go back to his country” after reports emerged that Britain did not have as many mass shootings as the US. Green hit back, saying there was “murder of all kinds” in Britain.

Green said Mitch McConnell (pictured) failed the GOP to support the Senate bill

Green said Mitt Romney (pictured) failed the GOP to support the Senate bill

Green also named several Republicans he said had failed the GOP, including Mitch McConnell (left) and Mitt Romney (right). ‘I don’t mind naming him, because people across our country are angry at him,’ he claimed bluntly

The Second Amendment has been a hot button topic in America for decades, as well as gun control.

It comes after several mass shootings in the US, including at an elementary school in Uvalde, Texas, that killed 19 students and two teachers.

According to the Gun Violence Archive, there have been a total of 66 mass shootings since the May 24 tragedy – which defines a mass shooting as four or more injured or killed.

Lawmakers have been prompted to come to a conclusion on the increasingly pressing issue as children claim to be afraid to return to school and teachers are once again tasked with the complex task of reforming classrooms to protect youth.

The bill provides $750 million to 19 states that have ‘red flag laws’ making it easier to temporarily take firearms from dangerous people, and with violence prevention programs in other states.

States with ‘red flag’ laws that receive money will have to put in place legal processes for the gun owner to fight the removal of firearms.

The bill would distribute money to states and communities to improve school safety and mental health initiatives.

Senate bargainers reached agreement on Tuesday, with a final route likely by the end of the week.

The 80-page bill was released nine days after lawmakers agreed a framework for the plan and 29 years after Congress last banned large firearms.

Green later claimed in the press conference that ‘the Senate Gun Bill is a complete failure.’

He also boldly listed politicians he said had failed the Republican Party, including Mitch McConnell and Mitt Romney, because they voted in favor of gun control.

She also said that when 79-year-old President Joe Biden was a senator, he made his school a “gun-free zone” and said he left American students like ducks. [or] Target for anyone who wants to kill them.’

She said that her now ‘friends’ – Republicans who voted in favor of stricter gun laws – no longer support “Republican voters.”

He bluntly said, ‘I don’t mind naming him, because people across our country are angry at him.’

‘We have to change our Republican Party and this is where it needs to be, because if we don’t start protecting the freedoms and rights of Americans, and put Americans first, our voters don’t want to put us in charge.’

Although 65 percent of voters have expressed support for gun reform since the Uvalde shooting, A. According to morning consultation/Political survey, conducted in May.

Of those who voted, 44 percent of Republicans, 66 percent of independents and 86 percent of Democrats supported the change.

The Senate on Tuesday introduced a bipartisan gun reform bill, on which 14 Republicans joined Democrats.  A renewed call for gun reform follows the deaths of 19 children and two teachers in Uvalde, Texas, after a mass shooter entered the school and killed them (Pictured: One of the Uvalde funerals)

The Senate on Tuesday introduced a bipartisan gun reform bill, on which 14 Republicans joined Democrats. A renewed call for gun reform follows the deaths of 19 children and two teachers in Uvalde, Texas, after a mass shooter entered the school and killed them (Pictured: One of the Uvalde funerals)

Salvador Ramos (pictured), 18, recently bought an AR-15 to use in a shoot where a relative of his had attended.  After the shooting, 65 percent of polled voters said they support run reform – 44 percent of Republicans agreed.

Salvador Ramos (pictured), 18, recently bought an AR-15 to use in a shoot where a relative of his had attended. After the shooting, 65 percent of polled voters said they support run reform – 44 percent of Republicans agreed.